17th Century Men’s Neckwear

We can distinguish between six types of men’s neckwear during the Seventeenth century.


The Ruff

A symbol of an aristocrat in society. The ruff held heads high showing the men’s importance and that they did not need to work hard.

The ruff worn by men were stiff and high, and they were closed, forming a complete circle.

The Ruff (also worn during the previous century)

The Ruff (also worn during the previous century)


The Underpropper

The underpropper is a wire frame that supported first the ruff and later the wisk.

The underpropper

The Underpropper


THE LIMP OR UNSTARCHED RUFF

The Limp or Unstarched Ruff

The Limp or Unstarched Ruff


The Wisk

The Wisk, also called a Golilla, a large collar, often embroidered and edged with lace.

Neckwear: Wisk or Golilla, a large collar, often embroidered and edged with lace. Portrait of Peter Courten, attributed to Salomon Mesdach, 1617

Portrait of Peter Courten, attributed to Salomon Mesdach, 1617


The Falling Band

The falling band, which looked very much like an ordinary collar.

The falling band, which looked very much like an ordinary collar. Frederick V, Elector Palatine, c1630.

Frederick V, Elector Palatine, c1630.


The Cravat and the Steinkirk

The cravat, a linen strip usually ending in lace, was held in place by a ribbon bow at the neck. It became narrower and longer towards the end of the 17th century and was made of muslin instead of lace. The cravat is important , as it was the precursor of the tie worn by men today.

The Steinkirk (right) was a variation of the cravat. French soldiers had no time to arrange their cravats properly, instead they quickly twisted them through a buttonhole, out of the way.

The  cravat, a linen strip usually ending in lace, was held in place by a ribbon bow at the neck. The Steinkirk (right) was a variation of the cravat.

The cravat (left)  Steinkirk (right)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s